The Man Who Could Not See Far Enough, 1981, 33 min

Peter Rose

Experimental, Filmmaker in Attendance, Historic Film, Short Film, Special Presentations

THE MAN WHO COULD NOT SEE FAR ENOUGH uses literary, structural, autobiographical, and performance metaphors to construct a series of tableaux that evoke the act of vision, the limits of perception, and the rapture of space. Spectacular moving multiple images; a physical, almost choreographic sense of camera movement; and massive, resonant sound have inspired critics to call it "stunning" and "hallucinatory." The film ranges in subject from a solar eclipse shot off the coast of Africa to a hand-held filmed ascent of the Golden Gate Bridge, and moves, in spirit, from the deeply personal to the mythic. "The man who could not see far enough" has won major awards of distinction at numerous festivals both here and abroad, including the Oberhausen, Edinburgh, American, and Sydney Film Festivals, has been broadcast nationally, and is in collections at Centre Pompidou in Paris and at Image Forum in Tokyo.

16mm


Directed by Peter Rose


Showing:

Wednesday, March 28 12:30pm

Peter Rose: Juror Presentation

“Some of us work in a proximate relation with our intended audiences, speaking familiar languages so that the archetypes of our culture may be recognized; and some work out a

Michigan Theater (Screening Room)